Blog

Injuries can often be used as an excuse to skip out on a gym session but there is generally always going to be an option available for you to implement; to at the very least maintain strength when inhibited by injury. Read More
We love to implement this exercise as a great way to not only teach people how to activate their glutes but also as a great way to rehab/prehab form hamstring injury. Read More
The knee/leg extension isn’t something you see a lot of in the functional training space. 

However, if there is a weakness in your quads it can be a great way to build up the strength required to assist your main lifts. Read More
tiny gains
When it comes to your bank balance compound interest the greatest concept you have ever heard of. Imagine, earning extra money on the money you have earnt.

But there is a tangible outcome for this. You can actually see the numbers going up and increasing marginally day to day, week to week or month to month.

When it comes to your body and your health those improvements aren’t as tangible. You can’t see most of the improvements that happen on a day to day basis, you are living the change, so each day you wake up you just feel like you.

But if you were to wake up 6 months from now and everything just magically felt 10x better you would notice that difference right away.

Just because you don’t feel different to how you did yesterday doesn’t mean you aren’t a whole lot different to how you were 6 months ago.

If you want to be 10% better in 6 months time. Start by adding that extra 1% a day now. And in time the little things add up to make BIG differences.

Focus on making subtle changes every day.
- Do 1 more rep
- Go to bed 5 minutes earlier
- Eat 1 more fork of vegetables
- Stretch for 10 seconds more
- Walk 50m further
- Read 1 more minute
- Learn 1 more thing
- Ask 1 more question

You can never have enough variations of pulling exercises and this one is a ripper. The pendulum row allows you to work on not only stabilising through your hips, and abs but it is also a great way to add some dynamic resistance to your pull work.

We aim to add in a minimum of 1 pulling movement for every pressing movement we program.

This variation is exceptionally good as when you pull the pendulum up, the load will actually increase adding more resistance at the top of the movement. Similar to adding bands or chains to the load.

This type of dynamic resistance is often neglected for pulling movements but should definitely be implemented regularly.

The pull through is a great exercise for developing glute and hamstring strength. It’s allows you to perform a hinging movement with the load anchor to the rear which makes it highly specific to the movement patterns of running, jumping and cycling. Read More

The reverse hyper extension is an amazing addition to any lower body strength program. 

The dynamic movement targets the glutes, hamstrings and lower back so is perfect as a supplemental exercise to improve your deadlift & squats.

It can also be a great as an injury prevention tool for sport specific training. As working to control the eccentric portion of the movement places similar emphasis on the body to deceleration which can be the cause of many injuries in athletes particularly those in sports requiring frequent change of direction.

Make sure your hips are in the crease of the pad, engage your lats and abs as you hold the handles.

Squeeze through your glutes as you extend up & control the load on the way down, but keep the movement fluent.

This is great power exercise you can implement as a part of your accessory work or when equipments is limited.

It can be great to help develop speed and power in the first few steps of acceleration as well as teaching the athlete to generate power from the ground & hips for any throwing sports (baseball, cricket, javelin, boxing).

Start with your feet level and the ball in one hand, step forward with your opposite leg. Then driving through the rear foot launch the ball as hard as you can into the wall.

Repeat 5-8 times on each side.

 

Need a simple power exercise you can do almost any where? Or want to get the nervous system primed before your bigger lifts?

The D’Ball overhead throw is a great way to get some explosive movement through your hips, knees and ankles.

Be sure to get all the drive through your lower body, the ball should feel almost weightless through your arms and shoulders.

Look to get a good trajectory on the ball aiming for both maximum height and distance.

A big part of training to generate force should also be learning to absorb it. This is a great exercise for working on both.

Using a Deadball, drive with your legs to throw the ball at a wall with maximum horizontal force.

This should also force you to jump forward. Focus on the landing absorbing the force by breaking at your knees and hip and landing in an athletic position similar to a quarter squat.

As a progression to this you can land in a single leg stance. Make sure you balance and stick the landing for 1-2 seconds.